Habitot Children's Museum

FALL-WINTER HOURS
October 1- March 31
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Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 4:30
9:30 - 4:30
9:30 - 4:30

SPRING-SUMMER HOURS
April 1 - September 30
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
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Sun

9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 4:30
9:30 - 4:30
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THIS MONTH'S SPONSOR
State Farm Insurance
Berkeley Agent, Gary Eason
http://garyeason.net/



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Habitot Children's Museum
2065 Kittredge Street
Berkeley, CA 94704
(510) 647-1111
www.habitot.org


Batteries in Electronic Devices - Serious Hazard to Young Children
Each year in the United States, more than 2,800 kids - one child every three hours - is treated in emergency rooms after swallowing button batteries from an electronic device. The number of serious injuries or deaths as a result of button batteries has increased nine-fold in the past decade.

Button batteries can be found in cell phones, mini remote controls, calculators, watches, key fobs, digital scales, hearing aids and even musical greeting cards. Kids love to pick up these electronics, play with them, occasionally drop them or take them apart, releasing the dangerous button batteries inside. These button lithium batteries are especially appealing to the child's eye, as they are shiny and look like candies. They can easily fit into small mouths, ears or noses. If a child swallows one of these batteries, it can pass through his or her body without incident, but this isn't always the case.

The saliva in a child’s mouth can trigger an electrical current. This causes a chemical reaction that can severely burn the esophagus in as little as two hours. Left unchecked, battery ingestion can be fatal. Children who survive ingestion will face serious health issues. Permanent paralysis of the vocal cords can occur, forever robbing them of their speech. These batteries can also be harmful if lodged in other places. They can burn through the cartilage in the nose or into the inner ear, causing hearing loss or difficulty breathing.

Here are few tips to make sure these batteries stay where they belong.

  • Be vigilant and look at every product at home to see if it has a battery compartment that can be opened by the child and if so, make sure it is secured with heavy tape. If not, it needs to be treated like a medication -- up high, out of reach and locked up.

  • Spare batteries should always be kept in childproof containers or locked up. Discard used batteries immediately – but not in easily accessible wastebaskets.

  • When changing a battery, never hold batteries in your mouth.
    This is modeling behavior you absolutely do not want your child to imitate!

  • Time is critical with battery ingestions. If you think your child has ingested a battery, or if you see him drooling, having difficulty swallowing, or vomiting, take him to the emergency department immediately to get evaluated. Do not second guess whether anything was ingested. Leave that to the emergency room doctors to determine.

  • Enter the National Battery Ingestion Hotline (202-625-3333) into your phone right now. Call any time for additional questions or treatment information.

 
For additional information, please go to http://www.safekids.org/safetytips/field_risks/batteries
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