Habitot Children's Museum

FALL-WINTER HOURS
October 1- March 31
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 4:30
9:30 - 4:30
9:30 - 4:30

SPRING-SUMMER HOURS
April 1 - September 30
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 4:30
9:30 - 4:30
Private Rentals Only

THIS MONTH'S SPONSOR
State Farm Insurance
Berkeley Agent, Gary Eason
http://garyeason.net/



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Habitot is a nonprofit, 501(c)3 organization that relies on community support



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Habitot Children's Museum
2065 Kittredge Street
Berkeley, CA 94704
(510) 647-1111
www.habitot.org


Best Practices for Employing a Nanny

Working parents are generally unprepared to become someone’s “boss” when they search for and hire a nanny, au pair or long-term care provider for their childcare needs. Unlike professional workplaces, parents have no HR department to turn to with questions about wages, raises, benefits or laws and regulations related to hiring domestic workers. The good news is that there are resources to support and guide parents when they become employers.

Attend a FREE workshop at Habitot conducted by the Hand in Hand: The Domestic Employers Network on Thursday, March 12 from 6:30-8pm. The workshop will offer a safe space to discuss questions and dilemmas, share employer and worker perspectives on their relationships, offer guidance and resources for best practices, and provide information on laws and regulations. Register at EmployingANanny.eventbrite.com

By becoming informed before hiring, parents have the opportunity to create from the outset a positive, long-lasting relationship with their employee. This ultimately benefits their child, and is therefore worth the investment of time and energy upfront. Key issues include what and how to pay, what is fair, what benefits to offer, how to establish working contract and how to ensure open communication. Ensuring that your employee has what she needs financially to sustain herself and her family can make a difference in the quality of care and in caregiver turnover (with its resulting stress on parents and children). By offering the worker you employ the highest wage and best benefits you can—and by showing her how much you value her work—you are investing in the stability of your household and your child’s sustained relationship with your caregiver.

Hand In Hand: The Domestic Employers Network offers these great tips for employing nanny or caregiver in your home.


    Write a contract together. For parents, it’s a great opportunity to clearly state your needs and expectations. A contract increases the likelihood that a hired caregiver will meet a parent’s needs and expectations. For the worker, a written description of job duties, benefits, and work terms professionalizes the relationship, fosters job stability, and builds trust. All employees appreciate having a full understanding of what is expected in their jobs and what can be expected from the employer.

    Pay a fair wage. This wage may vary from family to family, and by the experience and recommendations of the care provider, but should be consistent with the local living wage (in the Bay Area, at least $15/hour) and should increase as responsibilities increase. Consider including cost of living increases, overtime wages and year-end bonuses.

    Consider benefits. You may not be able to give the same benefits as a national corporation, but consider augmenting the hourly wage with an additional $2/hour to help your employee pay for healthcare costs. Likewise, because many care providers have children of their own, and get sick themselves, consider paid sick leave or paid time off as well as paid holidays.

    Commit to communication. Open and respectful communication goes a long way in creating a caring, supportive, and productive environment. Many employees, especially those whose first language is not English, may not initiate conversations or understand how to interact with an employer. It is often up to the employer to establish respectful and open communication and to encourage employees to be forthcoming about issues or concerns.
 
Want more information?

Visit http://domesticemployers.org/ to read more about being a good domestic employer. And, consider signing their Fair Care Pledge here and join a growing movement of domestic employers who are working to improve working conditions for domestic workers and increase respect for the people who do this important work.

 
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