Habitot Children's Museum

FALL-WINTER HOURS
October 1- March 31
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 4:30
9:30 - 4:30
9:30 - 4:30

SPRING-SUMMER HOURS
April 1 - September 30
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun

9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 12:30
9:30 - 4:30
9:30 - 4:30
Private Rentals Only

THIS MONTH'S SPONSOR
State Farm Insurance
Berkeley Agent, Gary Eason
http://garyeason.net/



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Habitot Children's Museum
2065 Kittredge Street
Berkeley, CA 94704
(510) 647-1111
www.habitot.org


Your Children and Auto Safety
Your children spend a fair amount of time in the car, so it’s all the more important to educate yourself about auto safety. Everyone knows about using car seats, but perhaps not all of the nuances about installing them correctly, and there are a host of other auto-related safety measures that parents should know about because they will prevent needless injuries and deaths.

Attention to these issues will help keep you and your family safe on the road.


  • Distracted Driving - Distracted driving is thought to be the cause of 80 percent of all crashes, and parents of young children are especially vulnerable to distractions. In fact, research has found that children are about four times as distracting to drivers as adult passengers are, and babies make it eight times harder to concentrate.

    While driving, always keep your eyes forward at all times. Resist the urge to reach back or take your eyes off the road even when you’re stopped. Set the ground rules with your children. Tell them that parents need to pay attention to the road, so that everyone is safe. If they know you can’t and won’t react, then they won’t expect it. If you must tend to your child immediately, pull over to a safe spot. It’s safer to get off the highway and go into a gas station, than move to the side of the road where you could face other hazards such as the possibility of getting struck by another vehicle. Stay off the cell phone. No talking, no texting. It’s not only dangerous, it’s illegal. Even hands-free phones can be distracting. If you need to make or answer a call, pull over to a safe place first.

  • Secure Objects in Car - Ordinary objects in cars and trucks are responsible for 13,000 injuries each year. Those water bottles, toys, canned goods and laptops all become dangerous projectiles when hurling through the air during collisions. At 55 miles per hour, a 20-pound object hits with 1,000 pounds of force. Use the trunk, cargo area, and small compartments to store your belongings and secure large, heavier objects low to the floor. Use this as an opportunity to keep your car clean!

  • Leaving kids in car - Never leave infants or children in a parked vehicle, or especially in a car with the engine running, even if the windows are partially open. Even cool temperatures in the 60’s can cause the temperature to rise well above 110° Fahrenheit inside your car. Children's bodies overheat easily, and infants and children under four years of age are among those at greatest risk for heat-related illness.

    Use the "Look…then Lock" technique: Get in the habit of always opening the back door of your vehicle when you reach your destination to make sure no child has been left behind. Leaving something you'll need (your cell phone or purse, for example) on the floorboard in the back seat with help this become a habit Or keep a large teddy bear in the child's car seat when no one's in it. When the child is placed in the seat, put the teddy bear in the front passenger seat as a visual reminder that the child is behind you in the car seat.

  • Carry A Roadside Emergency Kit - A roadside emergency can happen at any time, whether your car is new or old. A range of problems can turn an everyday outing to a nightmare, from a tire failure or mechanical breakdown to running out of fuel or stuck in mud or snow. At best, it's an annoyance; at worst, it can compromise your and your child’s safety. Carry a basic emergency kit – extra water and food, first aid kit, flashlight, cell phone charger, blanket, extra clothes and diapers, and emergency tools which can increase your safety, reduce stress, and help you get back on the road faster. Check frequently that first-aid supplies are current; water is fresh; and food is dry.
Regularly maintain your vehicle to ensure it's in working order; that the spare tire is properly inflated; that batteries are not discharged. The more tools you carry (in a secure compartment, of course) the easier emergencies will be. Become familiar with how each tool works before you need to use it in an emergency.

  • Car Seat Safety - Until they are at least 8 years old or are 4’9” tall, your child should be buckled in a child safety seat or booster every time he or she rides in a car. California law requires that child passengers be secured in an appropriate child safety restraint (safety seat or booster seat). All infants should be in a rear-facing seat until they are 2 years old or until they reach the highest weight/height limits allowed by the car seat’s manufacturer. Each year, hundreds of lives could be saved if children were protected in cars by using child safety seats. Even if you read the instructions on your car seat thoroughly, you should always have your car seat’s installation checked by a professional. Research shows that 4 of every 5 car seats are installed incorrectly.
With For more information, check out the resources below, and be sure to attend Habitot’s Early Childhood Safety Campaign events – including free car seat inspections!
 
Resources:

Safe Kids Web Site.
safekids.org

American Academy of Pediatrics.
www.aap.org/advocacy/releases/summertips.cfm

California DMV.
www.dmv.org/ca-california/safety-laws.php - Leaving-Children- or-Pets-Unattended-in-a-Car

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
www.nhtsa.gov/Driving+Safety/ Child+Safety/Keeping+Kids+Safe:+Inside+&+Out

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